Is this the future of book publishing?

Book publishing is in a bit of a weird place right now. The internet, much like Gutenberg’s printing press, has put power back in the hands of individuals. The spread of good (and bad) ideas, great stories, entertainment and knowledge has never been so easy.

That being said, there’s also a lot of noise. Finding an audience can be tricky because sometimes the internet feels like a big wide open space that you can shout into without ever being heard.

Click to explore the future of book publishing with me.

 

 

Why Traditional Publishing Will Fail (and what it means for writers)

I saw an interesting job posting on LinkedIn recently. Macmillan Publishing was hiring a Digital Strategist/Product Owner for a “new online self-publishing platform and community.” From the description, it looks like they’re on track to create a competitor to Booktrope.

There’s lots of money to be made after all. Self-publishing is the future because it’s so easy to do. Give authors a community, a platform, and some resources to help with outreach and the technical aspects of online publishing and you’re bound to get a few winners. Take 30% of all book sales with little to no work on your end and boom! you’ve struck gold. It’s worked out for Booktrope so far.

HERE’S WHY TRADITIONAL PUBLISHING WILL FAIL. CLICK TO FIND OUT WHY IT WILL BENEFIT YOU.

Book Marketing Isn’t Easy: 3 Questions For Every Author

I’ve been getting a lot of emails lately about book marketing. Authors feel frustrated that they haven’t figured out how to “get the word out” about their books as one reader put it. Many don’t have a whole lot of money to spend on promoting their books and they don’t know how to invest their time wisely.

I’ve worked with a few authors over the past year or so on their book marketing strategies. There are three main questions I always want to find out before we get started. These questions form the basis of how successful an author will be and which direction they need to go to find that success.

Hopefully sharing these questions with you will help provide direction in your own book marketing efforts.

CLICK TO SEE THE 3 QUESTIONS EVERY AUTHOR SHOULD ASK

2015 Reflections and 2016 Resolutions

(I can’t do everything.)

In 2015 I realized that I can’t do everything. In 2016 I will focus and accomplish the goals that are most important to me:

  • I will work with clients who see value in my services.
  • I will create products that will save me time and benefit my customers.
  • I will finally publish my novel!

What are your goals for this year?

About Michael Doane

Michael Doane is an author, strategist, and #eventprof who’s passionate about education, technology, and alternative publishing. In his spare time he reads, hikes, and writes novels about ordinary people doing extraordinary things.Email him, or find him on Twitter.

How To Write A Novel In 30 Days or Less

How I Finished the NaNoWriMo Challenge with Time to Spare

Every November thousands of people gather online and in person to try to write a novel in thirty days or less for something called National Novel Writing Month. It may sound like an insane task, but every year hundreds accomplish this goal with the support of a huge community of writers.

This year I decided to give NaNoWriMo a try on a whim. I came up with the idea for my novel on the morning of November first while taking a shower. I had planned to begin querying agents throughout the month of November on behalf of my first novel, The Worst Form of Violence, but I decided putting it off for a month wouldn’t hurt.

What I Learned While Writing My First Novel

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About two weeks ago I finished my first novel, currently entitled The Worst Form of Violence. I’ve started quite a few novels and I have about a million ideas for others, but I thought this one was something special and I had a lot of encouragement from my fiancé. So I stuck with it and put all my effort into the project.

There were times when it was hard. Weeks where I put it aside, worked on other projects, and tried to put it out of my mind. It never went away. Constantly a burning reminder that I had something big, something important, something dear to me—no matter how much I hated it at the moment—was waiting for me to tend to and grow and spend time with.

So, late last year I decided no more messing around. I made writing my novel a habit…

READ THE REST HERE